Energiepolitik in der Region New England

Energiepolitik in der Region New England
Teichmann, Franziska; Raffaele Piria und Magdalena Magosch 2019: Energiepolitik in der Region New England. Berlin: adelphi.

Translated title: Energy policy in New England. Study is written in German.

New England is a leading region in climate and energy policy in the United States of America. Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont have in part ambitious emissions reduction targets in place, support the development of renewable energy sources and are role models in energy efficiency policy.

Currently, the region’s energy policy focuses on the enhancing security of supply and ensuring affordable energy prices. The New England states want to achieve these goals by energy diversification, deployment of renewable energies and energy efficiency measures.

New England’s energy supply is particularly put at risk during cold spells during winter, also leading to comparatively high energy prices. There are no significant fossil energy resources in the region, import capacities for natural gas are limited and grid as well as pipeline expansion projects are currently slowed down by public opposition.

This study has been conceived for a non-US public of energy policy and power sector experts. It provides an overview of the energy region New England, relevant debates regarding energy and climate policy, the institutional setting and the common power market. The study accompanies the New England-Germany Energy Transition Forum in Cambridge, Massachusetts on 16 May 2019, a bilateral conference hosted by the German Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) and the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) taking place at Harvard Law School by courtesy of the Environmental and Energy Law Program.

Simultaneously, two additional studies are published, accompanying the same event: “Offshore Wind Deployment in Germany, Facts and Policy Lessons” (adelphi) and “Decarbonising heat in buildings – a comparison of policies in Germany and New England“ (RAP).

Further publications in the series