The role of clean hydrogen in the future energy systems of Japan and Germany – An analysis of existing mid-century scenarios and an investigation of hydrogen supply chains

The role of clean hydrogen in the future energy systems of Japan and Germany - Study
Jensterle, Miha; Jana Narita, Raffaele Piria, Sascha Samadi, Magdolna Prantner, Kilian Crone, Stefan Siegemund, Sichao Kan, Tomoko Matsumoto, Yoshiaki Shibata and Jill Thesen 2019: The role of clean hydrogen in the future energy systems of Japan and Germany. An analysis of existing mid-century scenarios and an investigation of hydrogen supply chains. Berlin: adelphi.

Germany and Japan have both gained substantial experience with hydrogen production and applications, albeit with focus on different sectors. They also share similar drivers for hydrogen development and, of course, similar technical and economic opportunities and challenges. However, there also are relevant differences in the policy priorities and approaches.

Notwithstanding differing emphases and patterns, the two countries share three main drivers for hydrogen development and deployment: climate mitigation and other environmental goals, energy supply diversification, and technological leadership. In this context, hydrogen has been identified by the German and the Japanese governments during the Energy Policy Dialogue as having potential for closer cooperation.

The authors of this study provide an overview of demand-side deployment by sector (residential, transport, industry, power generation and power-to-x) for both countries, as well as of their hydrogen policy debates, key institutions, R&D programs and demonstration projects. They also present a short survey on relevant international platforms and initiatives in which Japan and Germany participate.

On the basis of a meta-analysis of the role of hydrogen in 18 long-term energy system scenarios for Germany and 12 scenarios for Japan, this study draws conclusions on the possible role of hydrogen in the long term energy policy debates of both countries. Subsequently, the authors discuss sustainability criteria and certification schemes for clean hydrogen, compare the greenhouse gas intensity of different hydrogen supply chains and provide a data-based analysis to identify countries which could become important suppliers of clean hydrogen.